General All

    

 

Ordinance 210 Prohibiting Marijuana Under HB 3400   AN ORDINANCE PROHIBITING MARIJUANA PROCESSING SITES, MEDICAL MARIJUANA DISPENSARIES, MARIJUANA PRODUCERS, MARIJUANA PROCESSORS, MARIJUANA WHOLESALERS, AND MARIJUANA RETAILERS IN MALHEUR COUNTY
Ordinance 206 Relating to Medical Marijuana  An Ordinance Relating to Medical Marijuana Facilities;Establishing New Malheur County Code Ordinance No. 206 Title 3 Chapter 14;And Declaring an Emergency
Wolf Depredation Compensation Program   In 2011 the Oregon Legislature required the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) to establish and implement a wolf depredation and financial assistance grant program. This program awards annual funds to Oregon counties to compensate their ranching communities when livestock and working dogs are attacked and killed by wolves and to fund preventative measures to reduce the possibility of wolf attacks.
 
    
   
   
   
   

   

Bid Process

IF YOU DO NOT SEE THE PROJECT YOU ARE INTERESTED IN PLEASE CONTACT THE DEPARTMENT ADMINISTRATOR IN CHARGE OF THE PROJECT. SELECT THE LINK TO THE DESIRED PROJECT TO RECEIVE MORE INFORMATION.


All record name searches must be requested in writing and be accompanied by the appropriate fee. ($3.75 per name – please send check or money order.)  

Deeds, mortgages, liens, mining, County Court journal (1973 and older Mortgage and 1959 and older Mining records are in storage and require 24 hour notice to provide access to.)

Note:  It will depend on your web browser whether the forms are fillable and/or whether or not you can save the filled in form to your PC or not.  Internet Exporer is advised. 

 
Record Name (pdf fillable form)  Search Request Form  (please complete and submit, mail hard copy or print, scan and attach or save to your PC and send as attachment )

Payment by Credit Card (pdf fillable form) – Credit Card Information Form (please complete and submit, mail hard copy or  print, scan and attach or save to your PC and send as attachment )

Please send email requests to: countyclerk@malheurco.org
Searches will be completed in the order received and as time allows.

 Those licensed facilities with private drinking water supplies (i.e. wells) are monitored for compliance. The program focuses resources on the areas of highest public health benefit and promotes voluntary compliance with drinking water standards. It emphasizes prevention of contamination through source protection, technical assistance to water systems, and training of water system operators.

 

 Homepage of the State’s Drinking Water Program.
State database on all drinking water
systems.
Proper procedure to ensure
bacteriological water test is accurate.

 

 Food service workers are required to obtain a food handler card within 30 days of beginning work. The cost of the card is $10.00 and the card is valid for three years. Food handler cards issued in any county are valid throughout Oregon. If you have a valid food manager training certificate, it is accepted in lieu of a food handler card. Food handler cards issued in other states are not valid in Oregon. The following is a list of places a food handler card can be obtained:

Online:

Date:
Name of Facility:*
Facility Location:
Description of Complaint:*
Complainant Name:
Complainant Address:
Complainant Phone:
-
Complainant E-mail:
Word Verification: Enter the letters and numbers you see.

  A septic system is the most common method of sewage treatment for homes that are not on a public sewer line. A septic system consists of a septic tank, where solids settle and decompose, and a drain field where liquid discharged from the tank is treated by bacteria living in the soil. The septic tank settles out and decomposes solid sewage. The resulting liquid discharge from the tank slowly seeps into the drain field where it receives final treatment from bacteria living in the soil. Properly functioning septic systems treat sewage to prevent ground and surface water pollution. A malfunctioning system is a health hazard to your family and your neighbors, and will harm natural resources.

 

Before you buy

Before you buy undeveloped property, ask if the property has been evaluated for a septic system. If not, have Malheur County Environmental Health evaluate it for a septic system before purchase.

 When checking an existing septic system in a home you might want to buy, Environmental Health advises that you hire a qualified inspector to check out the system. Here are the main things to investigate:

Is the system legal?
Was it installed with a permit?
Is the system the proper size to accommodate the needs of your family or business?
How old is the system and has it been properly maintained?
When was the septic tank last pumped?
Have there been any problems in the past?
Are all plumbing fixtures connected to the septic tank?
How many people previously lived in the house?
Are there signs of septic system failure such as soggy areas over the septic tank or drain field areas?  

 

Installing a new system

Getting a new septic system installed is a two step process. The first step is to apply for a site evaluation. A septic system specialist will evaluate your property and identify the type of septic system needed and the best location for it. The second step is to apply for a septic system construction permit. Contact Malheur County Environmental Health for application forms or download application forms from this web site. There is a fee for a site evaluation as well as for the permit.

 Guide to procedures for installing a new septic system

  

Maintaining septic systems

You can avoid costly repairs by having your septic tank inspected on a regular basis for solids accumulation. When the solids accumulation is greater than 40 percent, have your septic tank pumped by a DEQ-licensed pumper. A properly constructed and maintained system can last a long time if you follow some common Septic System DO’s and DON’Ts:

DON’T flush material that will not easily
decompose, such as hair, diapers, cigarette butts, matches, or feminine hygiene
products.
DO conserve water to avoid overloading the
system.
DON’T wash or flush medicines or hazardous
chemicals like paint, paint thinner and bleach into the system. They kill the
bacteria needed to decompose wastes in the septic tank and drain
field.
DO use substitutes for household hazardous
waste.
DON’T drive over the septic tank or drain
lines.
DO learn the location of your septic tank
and drain field. Keep a sketch of it handy with your maintenance record for
service visits.
DON’T plant anything over or near the drain
field except grass. Roots from nearby trees or shrubs may clog and damage drain
lines.
DO cover the drain field with a grass cover
to prevent erosion and remove excess water.
DON’T dig in your drain field or build anything
over it.
DO keep your septic tank cover accessible for inspections and pumping. Install risers if necessary.
DON’T cover the drain field with a hard surface
such as concrete or asphalt.
DO keep a detailed record of repairs, pumping, inspections, permits issued, and other maintenance activities.
DON’T make or allow repairs to your septic system without obtaining the required permit. Use professionally licensed septic contractors when needed.
DO divert other sources of water, like roof
drains, house footing drains, and sump pumps, away from the septic system.
Excessive water keeps the soil in the drain field from naturally cleansing the
wastewater.
DON’T use septic tank additives. These products
usually do not help and some may even be harmful to your
system.
DO have your septic tank pumped out
regularly by a DEQ licensed contractor.
DON’T allow backwash from home water softeners
to enter the septic system.
DO call a professional whenever you
experience problems with your system, or if there are any signs of system
failure.
DON’T enter your tank, any work to the tank
should be done from outside. Gases that can be generated in the tank and/or
oxygen depletion can be fatal.

 

Signs of septic system failure

Pools of water or soggy spots, foul odors, and/or dark gray or black soils in the area of your drain field. Water that surfaces over the drain field during heavy rain or when doing laundry. Sewage backs up into the lowest drains in the house. Gurgling of drains, slow drainage (check for clogs first). Soggy soil overlying the drain field.